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LEARN: About Oishi's 2021 Shincha

Posted by Pedro Villalon on

Our first micro-lots of 2021 shincha are in! 
Grown in the warmer, volcanic soils of Kagoshima, these leaves are among the first that we've loved this year from Japan. 

About the Tea Artisan: 
Oishi San's tea factory was established in 1940, a very turbulent period in Japan's history.  The company has flourished; Oishi San owns tea fields in the region, but also sources leaves from a wide diversity of micro-farmers, finishing the tea at his facility in Yame.

 OISHI'S 2021 SAE AKARI


 
Experience: 
Notes of cedar leaves, umami, and a lingering green grape mouthfeel.
 

Micro Region:
Minami Kyushu, Kagoshima, Japan.

Cultivar: 
Sae Akari (さえあかり) is one of the youngest cultivars; it is the result of crossing Z1 with Saemidori. We only first encountered Sae Akari a couple of years ago, tasting some interesting samples from Gifu that offered intense sweetness (apple notes) and minimal astringency, at the expense of umami.  

In this case, Kagoshima soil worked differently, as umami is definitely a feature of this tea.

We recommend steeping this tea with water at 65 Celsius; ice brew (mizudashi) also yields stunning results. 

 

OISHI'S 2021 SAEMIDORI

Our first micro-lots of 2021 shincha are in! 
Grown in the warmer, volcanic soils of Kagoshima, these leaves are among the first that we've loved this year from Japan. 

Experience: 
Notes of young pine needles & steamed kailan; intense umami reminiscent of shade-grown tea. 

Micro Region:
Minami Kyushu, Kagoshima, Japan.

Cultivar: 
Saemidori (さえみどり) is a popular cultivar in Southern Kyushu, where it thrives in the warmer climate. It was created by crossing Asatsuyu (which has a very desirable flavour but low yields) with Yabukita cultivars; it was only registered in 1990. Saemidori and is used mostly for sencha; however, it can also produce very attractive gyokuro and matcha.

We recommend steeping this tea with water at 65 Celsius; ice brew (mizudashi) also yields stunning results. 

 


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