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LEARN: About Assam Wild Cultivar & Dream

Posted by Taryn on

ASSAM WILD CULTIVAR
LATUMONI, UPPER ASSAM, INDIA | 27.7°N 94.9°E

ABOUT THE TEA
This is a fragrant wild cultivar black tea from upper Assam. 
With notes of warm spice and rich malt, it is a lovely contrast to the Assam that dominates the exports of the region. 
The tea plants are clones from native tea trees that populated this valley long before the development of the tea industry in Assam. 
The leaves are big and chunky (much larger than any others we've seen from this region) and are 100% hand-crafted. 
ABOUT THE GROWER
Unlike the vast majority of teas from Assam, this tea is not from a particular estate.
This micro-farm in Upper Assam started production in the early 1990s as the government eased restrictions for individual farmers to craft their own tea.
This tea is 100% hand-crafted and represents some of the most beautiful, flavourful teas that we have sampled from this region.

 

DREAM
A BLEND OF BUTTERFLY PEA FLOWERS, LAVENDER & MINT.

ABOUT THE TEA
This tea is a whimsical blend of butterfly pea flowers, lavender and peppermint. 
We originally created this blend for our friends over at Casa Tua in Miami, and it very quickly gained popularity when we introduced it to our friends back in Vancouver. 
Peppermint is the dominant flavour in this blend (shout out to the menthol-intense peppermint we source from Washington), despite its intense purple colour. 
As with any blend containing butterfly pea flowers, the colour shifts from blue to purple when you change the pH. Paying homage to Thai flavours, we like to use lime juice to make it happen.
ABOUT THE GROWERS

Once again, we're featuring our Thai butterfly pea flowers this week. 
If you missed the blurb about the grower in our last couple of newsletters, here it is again!
We source our hibiscus flowers from a sustainable, female-run community made up of multiple farms (each of which produces a few kilos of flowers per year) in rural Thailand.
Because the harvesting of flowers is fairly easy, the community is able to employ a number of people, including the elderly and folks with special needs, who may not otherwise be considered easily employable.  


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